Silvermyst


"The mythology of the white masses pretends that while the evil planter and the London merchant grew fat on the profits of slave labor, the ‘poor white’ of the South, the Northern small farmer and the worker were all uninvolved in slavery and benefited not at all from it. The mythology suggests that slavery even lowered the living standard of the white masses by supposedly holding down wages and monopolizing vast tracts of farmland. Thus, it is alleged, slavery was not in the interests of the white masses.

Yet Karl Marx observed: ‘Cause slavery to disappear and you will have wiped America off the map of nations.’ Marx was writing during the zenith of the cotton economy of the mid-1800s, but this most basic fact is true from the bare beginnings of European settlement in Amerika. Without slave labor there would have been no Amerika. It is as simple as that. Long before the cotton economy of the South flourished, for example, Afrikan slaves literally built the City of New York. Their work alone enabled the original Dutch settlers to be fed and sheltered while pursuing their drinking, gambling, fur-trading and other non-laboring activities. Afrikans were not only much of early New York’s farmers, carpenters, and blacksmiths, but also comprised much of the City’s guards.

The Dutch settlers were so dependent on Afrikan labor for the basics of life that their Governor finally had to grant some Afrikan slaves both freedom and land in return for their continued food production. The Afrikan-owned land on Manhattan included what is now known as Greenwich Village, Astor Place, and Herald Square. Later, the English settlers would pass laws against Afrikan land ownership, and take these tracts from the free Afrikans. Manhattan was thus twice stolen from oppressed peoples."
J Sakai, Settlers: the mythology of the white proletariat (via leibor)

(Source: notesonresistance, via essenceofmoi)

— 1 day ago with 579 notes
#The black experience  #black history 
whitetears365:

Hmm but it’s not about race, right?

The wonders of using two opposite terms to describe the same action is one the mainstream media is well acquainted with.

whitetears365:

Hmm but it’s not about race, right?

The wonders of using two opposite terms to describe the same action is one the mainstream media is well acquainted with.

(via blasienne)

— 2 days ago with 25677 notes
#antiblackness 
tontonmichel:

People don’t get it is not just about hair, it’s about privilege. White people walk around thinking they have access to anything and anyone they want on comand. That is fueled by the position they put themselves in they world. Allowing them access with out permission to something as,”simple” as hair because its not a “big deal” only reinforces their mentality.

Other non-black people try it too. It’s just plain bad manners which might just earn the offender a broken wrist.

tontonmichel:

People don’t get it is not just about hair, it’s about privilege. White people walk around thinking they have access to anything and anyone they want on comand. That is fueled by the position they put themselves in they world. Allowing them access with out permission to something as,”simple” as hair because its not a “big deal” only reinforces their mentality.

Other non-black people try it too. It’s just plain bad manners which might just earn the offender a broken wrist.

(via the-real-goddamazon)

— 3 days ago with 3714 notes
#sheer idiocy 
Katanga's forgotten people. →

aquaticspacepussy:

Like many mixed-race children in Congo, they were born of a Japanese father who came to work in the mines of Katanga in south-east of the country. Today, they accuse their fathers of wanting to kill them so as not to leave behind any traces when they returned to Japan. FRANCE 24 met these men and women seeking the recognition that has always been denied them.

During the 1970s, an increased demand for copper and cobalt attracted Japanese investments in the mineral-rich southeastern region of Katanga Province. Over a 10-year period, more than 1,000 Japanese miners relocated to the region, confined to a strictly male-only camp. Arriving without family or spouses, the men often sought social interaction outside the confounds of their camps. In search of intimacy with the opposite sex, sometimes resulting in cohabitation, the men openly engaged in interracial dating and relationships, a practice mostly embraced by the local society. As a result, a number of Japanese miners fathered children with native Congolese women. However, most of the mixed race infants resulting from these unions died, soon after birth. Multiple testimonies of local people suggest that the infants were poisoned by a Japanese lead physician and nurse working at the local mining hospital. Subsequently, the circumstances would have brought the miners shame as most of them already had families back in their native Japan. The practice forced many native Katangan mothers to hide their children by not reporting to the hospital to give birth.

Today, fifty Afro-Japanese have formed an association of Katanga Infanticide survivors. The organization has hired legal council seeking a formal investigation into the killings. The group submitted official inquiry to both the Congolese and Japanese governments, to no avail. Issues specific to this group include having no documentation of their births, since not having been born in the local hospital spared their lives. The total number of survivors is unknown,

France 24 reports

There are no words to describe the information in this video. 

(via theadventuresofafemaleblacknerd)

— 4 days ago with 22 notes
"There will never be justice on stolen land."

- KRS One (via theretrospectofhiphop)

End of story.

(via themaroonvillage)

— 4 days ago with 8229 notes